Week 13 Summaries and Questions for the Life of Jesus Reading Plan


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Stuck at home with nothing to do? It’s never been better time to binge read about the life and teachings of Jesus. I’ve made it so easy and interesting with the the The Life and Teachings of Jesus 2020 Reading Plan. So turn off the TV and open your Bible and your heart to Jesus.

The Life and Teachings of Jesus – Week 13 – March 30-April 3:

Monday – John 5:19-29: Why did the Jews want to kill Jesus? Simply stated it was, “because not only was He breaking the Sabbath but He was even calling God His own Father, making Himself equal with God” (John 5:18). Did Jesus break the Sabbath? No, He only broke the Pharisees’ traditions regarding the Sabbath. Did Jesus really claim to be equal with God the Father? Yes, He did, and the audacious claims of Christ that we find in our text have colossal implications. Jesus prefaces His claims of equality with “Truly, truly” (v. 19) meaning, “I tell you the truth without the possibility of contradiction. Therefore, you must hear and accept what I have to say.” Jesus makes three great claims: He’s one with the Father in action (vv. 19-20), the power to give life just like the Father (vv. 21, 24-26), and like the Father Jesus has the authority to judge (vv. 22, 27-30). Even if we have already embraced this truth, we must repeatedly affirm it because the world wishes to deny this great truth.

In your own words, restate in what areas does Jesus claim to be equal with God the Father? What are the implications of this equality for you?

Tuesday – John 5:30-47: “You search the scriptures because you think that in them you have eternal life” Jesus said, “and it is they that bear witnesses about Me, yet you refuse to come to Me that you may have life” (vv. 39-40a). The Pharisees had three problems: One, they regarded the scriptures with such esteem that they linked study and memorization of holy text with salvation (vv. 39-40). They made knowing scripture an end in itself, instead of knowing the Savior of the scriptures. Second, they studied the scriptures with a wrong motive (41-44). They knew the word of God backwards and forwards, but they weren’t saved because they didn’t have the love of God within them. They loved their own opinions of the word of God which brought them the glory and notoriety. Self-love kept them from loving the God of scripture. Finally, the Pharisees didn’t really believe the scriptures they studied (vv. 45-47). Yes they would have died for their scrolls but they didn’t really believe what was written on them. The purpose of the Law of Moses was to expose their sinfulness and drive them to the Messiah. Instead, they hypocritically covered up their sins and rejected Christ. For believers today, there’s a great temptation to get caught up in the minutiae of scripture, which if left unchecked can trivialize our faith. There’s no doubt that as believers it is imperative that we immerse ourselves in the Bible, but it’s vastly more important that we respond to its teachings.

What “witnesses” does Jesus call forward to testify on His behalf and how does their testimony validate His clams? What factors influence your verdict for or against Jesus as being equal with God the Father?

Wednesday – Matt. 12:1-8 (cf. Mark 2:23-28; Luke 6:1-5): The disciples were hungry, so “they began to pluck heads of grain and to eat” (v. 1). The controversy that ensues centers not on whether the Sabbath should be observed but on what that observance entailed in practical terms. The Old Testament commandment was clear, “Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor, and do all your work” (Exodus 20:8-9). But what constituted “work”? Unlike the Pharisees, Jesus doesn’t attempt to define work. Rather, His reply consists of two related Old Testament analogies (vv. 3-4, 5-6), together with a prophetic quotation which exposes the underlying issue (v. 7), followed by a pronouncement which summarizes the thrust of the earlier analogies, “For the Son of Man is Lord of the Sabbath” (v. 8). In other words, Jesus possesses the right to interpret proper Sabbath keeping. According to the Pharisees, a person should go hungry rather than glean on the Sabbath.

How did this view of God’s Sabbath miss its true significance? (cf. Mark 2:27) In what way(s) did Jesus’ answer dodge His opponent’s preoccupations and get to the heart of the matter?

Thursday – Mark 3:1-6 (cf. Matt. 12:9-14; Luke 6:6-11): Continuing on from the grain fields from our last reading, Jesus enters the synagogue (perhaps in Capernaum) “and a man was there with a withered hand” (v. 1). Like gathering grain on the Sabbath, medicine and healing on the day of rest were highly regulated. It was an accepted principle in most Jewish circles that saving a life on the Sabbath was permissible but it must be life-threatening. Healing a withered hand could wait until the next day. So, Jesus takes the initiative in asking what is permitted on the Sabbath, “Is it lawful on the Sabbath to do good or to do harm, to save life or to kill?” (v. 4a). His adversaries remain stubbornly silent (v. 4b). In their eagerness for legal detail they had forgotten the mercy and grace shown by God to man when He made provision for the Sabbath day (cf. Mark 2:27). In their zeal for piety they have become calloused to the purposes of God and to the sufferings of humanity. Restoring the man’s hand demonstrates what it means “to do good” and “to save life” on the Sabbath. As Lord of the Sabbath Jesus delivers both the Sabbath and humanity from oppression.

The irony in this second Sabbath assault by the Pharisees is that while Jesus is healing on the Sabbath, the Pharisees are making plans to kill Him. How does Jesus’ attitude toward people and Scripture differ from that of the Pharisees?

Friday – Matt. 12:15-21: Immediately after the two Sabbath day clashes, Jesus withdraws from those hostile to Him. Nevertheless, He heals those who flock to Him but is anxious to prevent the people from forcing the issue of His Messiahship by prohibiting inappropriate publicity (v. 16). Through a quote from Isaiah, Matthew paints a portrait of Jesus as God’s chosen servant; one who is not quarrelsome but gentle. Thus, the confrontations Jesus has encountered are not of His making. Matthew draws a sharp contrast to Jesus’ critical opponents, they seek to kill Him, but Jesus won’t even break a “bruised reed” or quench a “smoldering wick.” They live to condemn, however Jesus lives to encourage the damaged and vulnerable people and will do so until God’s purpose of “justice” has been achieved.

To describe the Messiah’s character, Matthew quotes Isaiah 42:1-4. What does this Old Testament passage confirm about Jesus? Based on this description, why is He worth following?

Week 4 Summaries and Questions for The Life of Jesus Reading Plan


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If you haven’t downloaded your copy of The Life and Teachings of Jesus 2020 Reading Plan it’s always a good time to get started.

Week 4 – January 27-31:

Monday – Mark 1:1-8 (cf. Matthew 3:1-6; Luke 3:1-6): If Mark intends for his gospel to have a title, this is probably it, “The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God” (v. 1). Echoing Genesis 1:1, the introduction of Jesus is no less momentous than the creation of the world. Then Mark quickly moves to discussing the work of John the Baptist. John is important in all the gospels, not for his own sake, but as the beginning of the unfolding story of redemption which centers on Jesus.

In your own words, describe John’s mission (vv. 2-3), work (vv. 4-5), appearance (vv. 6), and preaching (vv. 7-8). What do you think it would be like to meet John?

Tuesday – Luke 3:7-18 (cf. Matthew 3:7-12): With a forceful and uncompromising tone, John bursts on the scene proclaiming a message of repentance and judgment. As the “crowds” flock to John, he challenges their motives (vv. 7-9; cf. to Matthew 3:7, “Pharisees and Sadducees”), calls for them to live out their repentant spirit by “bearing fruit of repentance” (vv. 10-14), deflects their Messianic expectations from himself (vv. 15-16) and warns them of the Messiah’s judgment to come (v. 17). Luke summarizes John’s work by saying, “With many exhortations he preached good news to the people” (v. 18).

Repentance and judgement aren’t always popular topics. How could you explain that these two elements of John’s message are indeed “good news” (v. 18)?

Wednesday – Matthew 3:13-17 (cf. Mark 1:9-11; Luke 3:21-22): The first appearance of John in Matthew’s gospel takes place in the context of John’s baptism. Unique to Matthew’s account is the exchange between John and Jesus in vv. 14-15. John, recognizing his inferior state (ref. Matthew 3:11-12) to the Savior states, “I need to be baptized by you, and do you come to me?” (v. 14). The substance of Jesus’ reply is clear enough: John is to overcome his objections and carry out the baptism as requested, “Let it be so not, for thus it is fitting for us to fulfill all righteousness” (v. 15). Jesus never rebelled against the Father’s will (see: 2 Corinthians 5:21; Hebrews 4:15; 1 Peter 2:22), so He did not need to be baptized for repentance of sin. However, the exact why behind Jesus’ words to John, “it is fitting for us to fulfill all righteousness” is not spelled out in Matthew.

Using the following verses: John 1:31-34; 2 Corinthians 5:21; Philippians 2:3-11; Hebrews 2:17, how would you answer someone you questioned why Jesus was baptized?

Thursday – Luke 3:23-38: Whereas Matthew records Jesus’ lineage from Abraham thru David to emphasize Jesus’ Jewish heritage, Luke traces Jesus through seventy-seven men back to Adam to connect the Savior with all of humanity. From Matthew’s perspective, Jesus is the fulfillment of Abrahamic and Davidic promises, but in Luke, Jesus is the fulfillment of humanity’s hope of redemption. By placing Jesus in a human lineage that ends with God, Luke signals His dual identity, human yet divine, both Son of Man and “Son of God.”

Reflect on this idea, Jesus is one of us! He stands with humanity, sinful humanity nonetheless, which He came to redeem. How does this idea deepen your appreciation of Him?

Friday – Matthew 4:1-11 (cf. Mark 1:12-13; Luke 4:1-13): Immediately after identifying with humanity through baptism and heritage, Jesus goes into the wilderness to be tempted as a man. Three times the Devil tempts Jesus (vv. 3, 6, 9), three times He counters with the authority of Scripture (vv. 4, 6, 10; cf. Deuteronomy 8:3; 6:13, 16). The scriptures make God (the Holy Spirit here in Matthew) the author of “testing” (see: Genesis 22:11; Deuteronomy 13:3; Psalm 81:7), not in seeking to make a person fall but in the sense that He proves the depth of a person’s commitment. Having proven His commitment to God’s plan, Jesus will now embark on His public ministry. Jesus’ temptations appear to have little resemblance to ours. Yet, Hebrews 4:15 tells us that He was “in every respect tempted as we are, yet without sin.”

Think of your fiercest temptation. In what way(s) is it like one of Jesus’ temptations? How will you combat your temptations in the same way Jesus did?

Week 23 Questions for 2019 Bible Reading Plan


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The early church had learned how to deal with persecution from outside the community, but needed help defending themselves against those who would destroy her from the inside. Differences within the church were not uncommon – but the recipients of Peters second epistle, Jude’s little letter, and Paul’s communications to the Corinthians faced something altogether different those who purposely distorted the gospel for their own gain and immorality. Peter and Jude denounce these false teachers, while Paul calls the Corinthians to a life of holiness, all three encourage their readers to stand firm in the faith, holding to the promise that Jesus would someday return.

This week in New Testament, Psalms, and Proverbs Reading Plan we’ll read 2 Peter and Jude and start 1 Corinthians. Along with these New Testament epistles, we’ll read Psalms that call us to communal thanksgiving and wisdom from Proverbs that challenges to be better parents for our children along with a prescription for a peaceful heart. It was good to be back writing this week after an extended break. Blessings to you friends and keep reading God’s word.

Monday, June 3 – 2 Peter 1; Psalm 64

After writing an earlier letter telling his readers to expect suffering as a part of this life, Peter now writes a second letter. This time he points toward the end of life: our eternal reward. It’s not uncommon to sometimes see v. 3 called the key to Peter’s second letter. What all would you expect to find in a book with this verse as an introduction? How are knowledge of Jesus and godly living related to each other? If you were to increase your knowledge of Jesus and more fully draw on His power for your life, what changes would you hope to see in yourself?

In Psalm 64, David asks God to judge the enemies of the righteous. This psalm begins with a vivid description of the devious ways of the wicked, especially their speech (vv. 3-5, 8). Still, David does not fear that God will lose control of the situation. He requests divine protection and voices confidence that God will judge his wicked foes. The godly should commit their case to God in prayer when they become targets of malicious gossip. They can also rest in the assurance that God will eventually turn the antagonism of the wicked back on them (ref. 1 Samuel 25). He will do so for His own glory and for the welfare of those who trust in Him. Why is gossip so hurtful? Recall a time when someone’s gossip especially hurtful. How did you respond? After reading Psalm 64, in what ways will you react the same or differently the next time someone spreads gossip about you?

Tuesday, June 4 – 2 Peter 2; Proverbs 14:22-29

As Peter continues preparing his readers to hold onto their faith without him (ref. 1:12-15), he addresses the dangers of heresy and targets the “false teachers” of his day who tempt Christians. Here Peter makes a stand for truth against heresy, providing us with an example of standing up for truth in a relative society. With so many different views about God, Christ and the Holy Spirit, how can we identify “false prophets” and “false teachers”? Study vv. 4-9 and any cross references you have, what did Peter want his readers to learn from these Old Testament events? Why are false teachers and their heresies like “waterless springs and mists driven by a storm” (v. 17a)? In what ways can you protect yourself from the influence of false teachers?

“In the fear of the LORD one has strong confidence, and his children will have a refuge. The fear of the LORD is a fountain of life, that one may turn away from the snares of death” (vv. 26-27). The catchword connection between these two proverbs is, “The fear of the Lord.” A life committed to reverential awe of God reaches beyond its own existence. Since evil not only attacks but also attracts, a parent must know and show their family something both stronger and better. Through faith the believer finds the abundant life that saves him and others (namely his children) from death. How would you define “The fear of the Lord” in terms a child would understand? In what ways will “children… have a refuge” in a parent who’s life is rooted in “the fear of the Lord”? Think of several concrete things you can do as a parent (or a parental figure) to show a child the joys of living for God.

Wednesday, June 3 – 2 Peter 3; Psalm 65

Nearly everyone is in agreement that the world will someday end, folks just differ on how it will end. From nuclear holocaust, to global-warming, to drug-resistant disease, or even alien invasion it seems there’s all sorts of end-of-the-world theories (or fantasies). The final chapter of Peter’s final letter speaks of the end-times destruction of the earth but not through catastrophe but through the return of Jesus. Naturally, there are those who scoff at the prospects of divine judgment. Peter and the church of his day had to contend with scoffers who cast doubt on the Lord’s returning, judging His creation and redeeming His people. Unfortunately, scoffers still abound. How does Peter answer the questions raised by the scoffers (vv. 5-7) and the faithful (vv. 8-10)? What words and phrases throughout this passage help describe the day of the Lord? Answers Peter’s question in v. 11, “Since all these things are thus to be dissolved, what sort of people out you to be…?” Why might living this way prepare you for the kind of day described here?

Psalm 65 is a praise psalm, full of hopeful, confident, even enthusiastic feelings in response to God’s goodness through His spiritual and natural blessings. This psalm is a communal song of thanksgiving that celebrates God blessing His people with forgiveness and a bountiful land (note the plural pronouns in vv. 3, 4, 5). Other communal psalms of thanksgiving are 66, 107, 118, 124, and 129. In spite of our sins, God provides atonement and blesses His environment with many good things so we can prosper and rejoice. It is only fitting that together we give God thanks. List four or more blessings this psalm expresses gratitude for. How do God’s wonders and blessings call forth songs of praise? What value does expressing gratitude to God in a communal setting hold for you? If you church doesn’t already do so, organize a thanksgiving service of songs, prayers, and testimonies of God’s blessings. Make sure you incorporate some of the communal thanksgiving psalms.

Thursday, June 4 – Jude; Proverbs 14:30-35

Jude lived in a time when Christianity was under severe attack from without by the political forces of the day and more importantly from within by aggressive false-teachers. Jude paints a bleak picture of the situation the church faces. He sees an apostasy that undermines grace, disdains authority, and appears beyond repentance and redemption. Thus, Jude calls the church to fight, in the midst of intense spiritual warfare, for the truth. In face of the problem of false-teachers, Jude gives his readers two sets of instructions: “remember” (v. 17) and “build yourselves up” (v. 20). Notice the specific instructions under each of these. How would remembering in the way Jude describes help believers keep the essential ingredients of the Christian faith? How would building ourselves up in the ways Jude outlines (vv. 20-23) help us keep on living in a way that is true to our faith? What errors in faith and life do you see as subtle dangers to today’s Christians? Using Jude’s little epistle as your source, how can you protect yourself, and other believers whose lives you touch, from falling into these errors?

“A peaceful heart leads to a healthy body; jealousy is like cancer in the bones” (v. 30). Here the Wiseman contrast the peace of contentment with the cancer of jealousy. A contented, peaceful heart will preserve one’s life, but jealousy will kill him. A person who is content with what they have in life possess a peace of mind that leads to a healthy mind, body, and soul. While on the other hand, a resentful mind, which focuses solely only what others have, is like bone cancer that rots the most firm components of the body and shortens a person’s life. Why do you think peaceful contentment leads to a healthy mind, body, and soul? How is jealousy like a cancer to rots a person from the inside? When do you find yourself tempted to be jealous of someone else? When those times come, what will you do to bring peaceful contentment into your heart? Ask God to give you a peacefully content heart.

Friday, June 5 – 1 Corinthians 1; Psalm 66

The church in Corinth was far from perfect. While in Ephesus, Paul hears from several sources a long list of complaints about this eager but misguided flock. From division and factions, to sexual immorality, to abuse of spiritual gifts, to false teaching about the resurrection and much in between the Corinthians were church in trouble. The most serious problem of the Corinthians was worldliness, an unwillingness to divorce themselves from culture around them. I think it’s safe to say, that of all the churches in the New Testament, the church at Corinth was perhaps the most dysfunctional. In light of the topics Paul will discuss throughout this epistle, why do you think he describes himself as “called by the will of God to be an apostle of Christ Jesus” (v. 1)? And why do you think he identifies his readers as “to those sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints” (v. 2)? Next, Paul surprisingly affirms his readers by giving thanks for them. What does he say about why he is thankful for them? How does Paul’s view of the Corinthians in these opening verses challenge you to view dysfunctional churches and Christians?

Psalm 66 is a song of thanksgiving, as was the previous one. We do not know the writer or the occasion for sure (though a crises of some sort is referenced in vv. 10-12). This joyful psalm begins with group praise (vv. 1-12) and then focuses on individual worship (vv. 13-20). The psalmist rehearses the Red Sea and Jordan River crossings from Israel’s past (v. 6a; ref. Exodus 14; Joshua 3-4) and testifies that God has always been faithful in the midst of serious troubles. First, communally then individually God’s people acknowledge His deliverance and invite other people to join them in praising Him (v. 8a). How might communal praise mentioned in Psalm 65 and here in vv. 1-12 encourage and foster individual worship (vv. 13-20)? How should the giving of thanks and recounting the Lord’s awesome deeds motivate our hearts to call others to know and worship God (v. 8a)? The psalmist ends with a note of his righteousness before God (vv. 16-20). What role should thanksgiving play in promoting a righteous life?