Week 9 Summaries and Questions for the Life of Jesus Reading Plan


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Just like it did 2,000 years ago, the Sermon on the Mount challenges disciple’s resolve to live the distinctness of the Christian counterculture.  Jesus calls us to us fidelity in marriage no matter what, truth telling at all cost, humiliation in the form of nonresistance, and above all to show our attitude of total love even to an enemy. His words here are both most admired and most resented. Yet, despite the difficulty of living our these teachings, our Lord’s word is good – intrinsically good for individuals and society. If you haven’t already, it’s always a good time to start The Life and Teachings of Jesus 2020 Reading Plan.

The Life and Teachings of Jesus – Week 9 – March 2-6:

Monday – Matt. 5:31-32: The third teaching of Jesus follows naturally from the second, inasmuch as sexual sin often leads to divorce. Again, Jesus requires a more exacting standard of His followers than was the norm of His day. The process for divorce under the Law of Moses is outlined in Deuteronomy 24:1-4. The bill of divorce, demanded by Moses and mentioned here by Jesus, was a protection for the woman that freed her to marry someone else. The religious teachers of Jesus’ day wrongfully assumed divorce was a part of God’s will and simply sending away one’s wife with a divorce certificate satisfied the Law’s demands (this is especially clear in Matthew 19:1-12). It’s against such a backdrop that our Savior calls on people to appreciate the true meaning and solemnity of marriage. For Him, marriage is intended to be a lifelong union of one man and one woman, and it is not to be dissolved lightly. Jesus’ teaching on divorce clearly contrasts with His and our culture.

Why do you think our Lord has such a high view of fidelity to one’s spouse? What would make your Top Ten List for how to avoid divorce?

Tuesday – Matt. 5:33-37: The fourth, “You have heard…” statement doesn’t actually appear verbatim in the Old Testament, but is perhaps a conflation of Leviticus 19:12, Numbers 30:2 and Deuteronomy 23:23. The situation described is one in which many Jews viewed swearing an oath by “heaven or earth, “or by “the temple,” or even by “one’s head” was not as binding as swearing “by God.” Jesus stresses that each one of these items belongs to God, so that the conventional distinctions were spurious. The point of our Lord’s teaching is not avoiding oaths all together (Paul makes oath statements on several occasions i.e. Romans 1:9; 9:1); rather the issue is telling the truth because God witnesses every word one speaks. Therefore, Jesus says, “Let what you say be simply ‘Yes’ or ‘No’; anything more than this comes from the evil one” (v. 37; cf. James 5:12).

According to Jesus, what’s the problem with making oaths? Why should oaths be unnecessary for the Lord’s followers?

Wednesday – Matt. 5:38-42: Revenge comes easily to us, “An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth” the saying goes. However, in this fifth saying, the Lord Jesus calls His disciples to a higher ethic that transcends tit-for-tat retribution. His teaching stresses the need to decisively break the natural chain of evil action and reaction that often characterizes human relationships. Jesus invites His hearers to grapple with the application of His points. Nonresistance means disdaining one’s honor (vv. 38-39), one’s most basic possessions (v. 40), one’s labor and time when others seek them by force (v. 41), and one must also disdain these things in view of the needs of the poor (v. 42); then, when the kingdom comes, one’s deeds, rather than one’s wealth and honor will matter (cf. Matthew 25:34-46). One’s vested interest must be in heaven, not on earth; if one cannot value the kingdom that much, one has no place in it.

Looking closely at vv. 39-42, how would you contrast our natural responses in such situations with the responses Jesus expects of us? What do you think is accomplished by turning the other cheek or going a second mile?

Thursday – Matt. 5:43-48 (Luke 6:27-36): With this, His sixth and last commentary on how the Law of Moses had been taught, our Lord teaches that one whose righteousness would surpass that of the scribes and Pharisees (ref. Matthew 5:20) must exemplify a higher standard of virtue than loving those friendly to one’s own interest. We all love our friends, but love for our enemies is quite another matter. As disciples of Jesus we are not to take our standards from our human nature but rather, from the God we serve. Our God is a loving God who indiscriminately gives good gifts to all, regardless of whether they are friend or foe. Therefore, we must be like Him loving even our enemies.

How is Jesus Himself an example of what it means to “Love your enemies” (v. 44)? How might you reflect the Lord’s character when you are mistreated? Focus on the one person who could be considered your chief enemy and, this week, reach out to him or her with some practical act of love.

Friday – Matt. 6:1-4: Today’s reading begins a new section in the Sermon on the Mount. In the next three readings, Jesus will teach on the proper practice of piety: Almsgiving (vv. 1-4); Praying (vv. 5-15), and Fasting (vv. 16-18). The overarching thesis of this section is: Do your righteousness for God to see you, not others (v. 1). In all three examples, Jesus warns us to not be like the “hypocrites” seeking public praise (vv. 2, 5, 16). Rather, our focus should be on God’s glory, which in turn will solicit His praise (vv. 4, 6, 18). Jesus begins this teaching with almsgiving. It’s an accepted fact that it is a religious duty to help the poor but, as in all ages, some are more interested in public reputation rather than relief of poverty. Our Lord teaches that it is indeed important to give, just not to be known to give.

According to Jesus, how are we to do acts of charity? Why is it important that we give this way? It what way(s) are you tempted to violate this principle?

Overcoming Serpents


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Many people are scared of snakes. Not me, I just hate them. I really, really hate snakes. In my book the only good snake is a dead snake. Therefore, Numbers 21.4-9 makes a real impression on the psyche. Just picturing thousands of poisonous snakes slithering around and biting with their venomous fangs sends chills up my spine. That’s the scene in our text this morning. On the heels of a great victory of the Canaanite king of Arab (Numbers 21.1-3), the children of Israel once again complain to Moses. They hate everything about their existence and they blamed Moses and God. Fed up with their insolence, the Lord sent poisonous snakes into the camp to kill the complainers. Yet, in His mercy God provided a way for them to be healed and to live. We should pay attention to this story because it mirrors our own attack from a fiery serpent the devil (cf. Revelation 12.9) and the healing and salvation God offers us.

Overview of Numbers 21.4-9

  • 4-5 | The people complained
  • 6 | God sent “fiery serpents”
  • 7 | The people repented
  • 8 | God provided the people a way to be healed
  • 9 | Those who followed God’s plan were healed and lived

This Old Testament provision for Israel’s healing was a foreshadowing of the salvation the Father provides to us in the cross of Jesus Christ. In His conversation with Nicodemus, Jesus gives us a richer meaning to this story, “And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up, that whoever believes in Him may have eternal life” (John 3.14-15).

Three Parallels Between Israel’s Situation and Our Own:

  1. THE SERPENT’S BITE KILLS:
    • 6 | Just as the serpent’s bite was deadly to Israel the great Serpent’s bite is deadly to us. Through different images, Paul, Peter and James describes Satan’s desire to kill us.
    • Ephesian 6.16 | Satan attacks us with flaming darts (arrows).
    • 1 Peter 5.8 | Satan is like a roaring lion seeking to maul and kill us.
    • Jams 1.14-15 | Satan is like hunter seeking to lure us in with temptation.
    • The serpent’s bite kills, it’s deadly but God has left us to die He’s provided a remedy.
  1. GOD PROVIDED A REMEDY:
    • 7-8 | God didn’t take away the serpents, but instead, He provided a remedy for the bites, the bronze serpent*.
    • Genesis 3.15 | It’s no different with us. From the “first bite” of sin, God has promised a remedy would one day come.
    • John 3:14; 12.32 | Jesus is that remedy. Just as the bronze serpent was lifted up, so to Jesus was lifted up on a cross to take our place and die for our sins.
    • Romans 3.22a-26 | We’ve all been bitten by sin. We can only be saved by God’s grace.
  1. THE REMEDY WAS UNMERITED BUT CONDITIONAL:
    • 9 | Moses fashioned the bronze serpent and lifted it up for all of Israel to see. The nation had sinned, yet God graciously gave them a remedy. But, to receive the healing they had to look by faith at the bronze serpent. The same is true for us.
    • Ephesians 2.1-10 | Our salvation follows the same order. It’s unmerited but conditional. We’ve all sinned, yet God graciously give us salvation, yet we must receive it by faith. How do we express that faith? Baptism.
    • Mark 16.15-16 | God’s grace is available to all, yet we must believe and unite ourselves to Jesus through baptism. Baptism is not a work (no more than looking on the bronze serpent would have been a work), rather it’s an act of faith just as looking at the serpent was an act of faith.

Just as God gave the Israelites the ability to overcome the fiery serpents of the desert, He has given us the ability to overcome Satan, the serpent of old. The question is, will we obey God or will you argue or complain about God’s ways? Do you want to be healed from the serpent’s bite and live? If yes, then here’s what you do… Look to Jesus! He is our remedy. He is our salvation. He is our hope. Look at Him lifted up on the cross dying for our sins. See Him overcoming death rising from the tomb. He’s calling for you to come and be healed and live for Him. But maybe you don’t want to be healed and live. Maybe you don’t think you’re sick but that doesn’t change the diagnosis. Maybe you don’t like the cure, it doesn’t matter. We’ve all been bitten by the serpent. I beg you, look to Jesus and live. If not, then you’ll die in your sins.

* According to 2 Kings 18:4, the bronze serpent became an idol, “[Hezekiah] removed the high places and broke the pillars and cut down the Asherah. And he broke in pieces the bronze serpent that Moses had made, for until those days the people of Israel had made offerings to it (it was called Nehushtan).”

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Week 8 Summaries and Questions of the Life of Jesus Reading Plan


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Without question, the Sermon on the Mount is the best-known part of the teaching of Jesus but perhaps the least obeyed. Throughout the centuries untold numbers of people have dissected, analyzed, discussed, taught, and wrote about this magnum opus of Jesus. Yet, its message continues to challenge readers today. It’s the nearest thing to a manifesto that He ever uttered, for it is His own description of what He wanted his followers to be and to do. For the next few weeks we’ll explore this great teaching of our Lord one section at a time. It’s always a good time to start The Life and Teachings of Jesus 2020 Reading Plan.

The Life and Teachings of Jesus – Week 8 – February 24-28:

Monday – Matt. 5:1-12 (cf. Luke 6:20-26): Without question, the Sermon on the Mount is the best-known teaching of Jesus. Throughout the centuries untold numbers of people have dissected, analyzed, discussed, taught, and wrote about this magnum opus of Jesus. Yet, its message continues to challenge readers today. After the scene is set in vv. 1-2, Jesus begins His discourse with a series of nine Beatitudes (vv. 3-12), a declaration of blessed happiness and joy. The sharply paradoxical character of these statements runs counter to conventional values. Thus, the Beatitudes call on those who would be God’s people to stand out as different from those around them.

The Beatitudes describe the qualities Jesus requires of those who will follow Him. How would your life look different if you lived out these sayings to their fullest?

Tuesday – Matt. 5:13-16 (cf. Luke 14:34-35): Coming out of the Beatitudes Jesus summarizes Christianity and its relationship to the unbelieving world through the elements of salt and light. “You are the salt of the earth” (v. 13). Believers flavor the world in which they live and help prevent its corruption. “You are the light of the world” (v. 14). The world needs the light of the gospel of Jesus, and it is through the disciples that it must be made visible. Ultimately, the disciple whose salt is diluted or whose light is hidden is worthless. Nominal believers who do not live a life of discipleship will be “thrown out and trampled under people’s feet” (v. 13); the phrase is intentionally graphic.

How are you “salt” and “light” in your community? List any areas in which your “salt” has lost its taste or your “light” may be hidden. What can you do today to change?

Wednesday – Matt. 5:17-20: “Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them” (v. 17). In this manner Jesus begins the second section of His sermon (5:17-48). Here He clarifies that He will neither give a new law nor modify the old, but rather explain the true significance of law and the prophets. Furthermore, Jesus “fulfills” the law by keeping it perfectly and embodying its types and symbols. With strong words, He warns against anyone breaking even the least of the commandments and teaching others to do the same. Lastly, the statement that the righteousness of those who enter the kingdom must exceed that of the scribes and Pharisees must have come as a very surprising, if not alarming, piece of news to His audience.

Looking ahead at vv. 21-48, how does Jesus illustrate that one’s righteousness must exceed that of the religious elites of His day, the scribes and Pharisees?

Thursday – Matt. 5:21-26 (Luke 12:57-59): Once Jesus has made it clear that He is not opposing the law but fulfilling it, He shows how the customary practice of the law in His day, as interpreted by the scribes and Pharisees, is inadequate. Jesus uses six varied topics to illustrate the concept of a righteousness which goes beyond the legal correctness of the scribes and Pharisees (see v. 20). Each is presented in the form of a contrast between what the people had heard, “You have heard that it was said…” to Jesus’ more demanding ethic, “But I say…” The principle of vv. 21-22 is that the actual committing of murder is only the outward manifestation of an inward attitude which itself is culpable before God. Angry thoughts and contemptuous words deserve equally severe judgment Jesus declares; indeed, the “the fires of hell” goes beyond the human death penalty which the Old Testament declared for murder.

In what way(s), are Jesus’ words about anger shocking? Why do you think that it’s important to come to terms quickly with those who have “something against you” (v. 23)?

Friday – Matt. 5:27-30: In this second saying, Jesus addresses adultery and lust. His warning against lust challenges many. Of course the Lord is not referring to noticing a person’s beauty, but to imbibing it, meditating on it, harboring a desire for an illicit relationship. This, Jesus says is tantamount to adultery. We should note that Jesus squarely places the blame and responsibility for lust on the person doing the lusting. Thus, Jesus declares in a graphic manner that by whatever means necessary, the lust-er should cast off the sin of lust. He doesn’t mean that one literally plucks out an eye or cut off one’s right hand to combat temptation. Rather His point is this, do everything you can to not sin; a partial loss, however painful, is preferable to the total loss of the body (and soul).

Jesus graphically illustrates the importance of dealing with sin in one’s life. What difference might His teaching make in the way that you consider your own personal conduct and decisions?

The Temptation of Jesus


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We all struggle with various temptations. Maybe you’re tempted to cheat, lie, or steal. Maybe your greatest temptation is indifference to those around you. Maybe the siren song of lust and sexual temptations are an allurement for you. Maybe your primary temptation is an angry outburst and an uncontrolled tongue. Maybe pride and a judgmental attitude are your temptation du jour. We could go on and on listing various temptations. Whatever sinful enticements you or I struggle with, the temptation of Jesus gives us an example, the ultimate example, of resisting the devil’s schemes to entrap our souls. Let’s begin by reading Matthew 4:1-11

(1) “Then Jesus was led up by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil. (2) And after fasting forty days and forty nights, he was hungry. (3) And the tempter came and said to him, ‘If you are the Son of God, command these stones to become loaves of bread.’ (4) But he answered, ‘It is written, “‘Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of God.'”

(5) Then the devil took him to the holy city and set him on the pinnacle of the temple (6) and said to him, “If you are the Son of God, throw yourself down, for it is written, “‘He will command his angels concerning you,’ and “‘On their hands they will bear you up, lest you strike your foot against a stone.'” (7) Jesus said to him, “Again it is written, ‘You shall not put the Lord your God to the test.'”

(8) Again, the devil took him to a very high mountain and showed him all the kingdoms of the world and their glory. (9) And he said to him, “All these I will give you, if you will fall down and worship me.” (10) Then Jesus said to him, “Be gone, Satan! For it is written, “‘You shall worship the Lord your God and him only shall you serve.'” (11) Then the devil left him, and behold, angels came and were ministering to him.”

1. His Temptations Were God-Ordained But Not God-Inflicted:

  • v. 1| The Spirit led Jesus into the wilderness to be tempted, but it was Satan who did the tempting.
  • Job 1:6-12| It’s not unlike Job’s experience.
  • James 1:13-15| James reminds us that God does not tempt us.

2. He Was Tempted When He Was Most Susceptible:

  • vv. 1-3| Jesus had been fasting, miraculously, for 40 days. He was physically, emotionally, and spiritually susceptible to Satan’s temptations
  • Matthew 26:40-41| Our Lord reminds the disciples, “the spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is so weak.” Despite our willingness to follow Jesus, Satan will attack us at our weakest point.
  • Matthew 6:13| This informs us on why we pray, “Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one.”
  • 1 Peter 5:8-9| If we resist Satan he will flee from us. However, we must not let our guard down because he will look for a “more opportune time” (Luke 4:13) to attack us again.

3. His Experience Was Unique Yet Universal:

  • vv. 3-9| Jesus’ temptations were unique in nature. I doubt any of us have ever been tempted directly by Satan in the same way Jesus was, yet, our Savior’s temptations are universal.
  • 1 John 2:16| All temptations (whether Jesus’ or our own) can be boiled down to lust of the flesh, lust of the eyes, and the pride of life.
  • Hebrews 2:18; 4:15| We can take strength from the fact that our Lord Jesus knows how we are tempted. We can go to Him for grace because His temptation experience was universal in nature.

4. He Resisted Temptations With The Word Of God:

  • vv. 4, 7, 10| Jesus thwarted each temptation by quoting scripture. There’s a model here for us to follow.
  • Ephesians 6:16, 17b| In the whole armor of God passage, we attack evil with “the sword of the spirit, the word of God” but we defend ourselves through the “shield of faith” because we believe God’s word.
  • Romans 10:17| The faith needed to confront Satan with God’s word comes from getting into God’s word.

5. His Temptations Were Tough But Temporary:

  • v. 11| Jesus’ temptations were no doubt tough. So tough, “angels came and were ministering to Him.”
  • 1 Corinthians 10:13| God promises we will not tempted beyond what we can bear. There is always a way of escape.
  • Jams 4:7| If we resist the Devil he will flee from us.
  • Hebrews 1:14| Angels are ministering spirits. Perhaps there a connection here. As angels ministered to Jesus following His temptation, then after we do battle with Satan God will send us heavenly help.

Jesus came in human form. He knows the weight of sin and the heaviness of temptation. He was not shadowboxing with the devil. Our Lord Jesus was tempted in every respect as we are, yet without sin. We sinners must learn from our Lord and cling to Him, that we might by faith win the victory for His glory and our good.

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Week 7 Summaries and Questions for the Life of Jesus Reading Plan


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The Life and Teachings of Jesus – Week 7 – February 17-21:

Monday – Matt. 4:12-17 (Mark 1:14): As Jesus starts His ministry, Matthew first sets the time frame, “when He heard that John had been arrested” (v. 12; cf. Mark 6:14-29 we’ll discuss John’s arrest and death with May 26th’s reading). Then he sets the geographical scene, “leaving Nazareth [Jesus] went and lived in Capernaum by the sea” (v. 13), followed by the theological significance “so that what was spoken by the prophet Isaiah might be fulfilled” (v. 14). Lastly, Matthew summarizes Jesus’ message, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand” (v. 17).

One feature of Matthew’s gospel is that he constantly connects Jesus’ life back to prophecy from the Old Testament (ref. 1:22; 2:15, 17, 23; 4:14; 8:17; 12:17; 13:35; 21:4; 27:9). What does Matthew want you, his reader, to see with the references?

Tuesday – John 4:46-54: Nothing can shatter a parent more quickly or more completely than affliction falling upon their child. Regardless of one’s station in life, trouble, sorrow, and death come to us all. Death was knocking at the door of an “official” (literally a noble-man or king’s-man perhaps from Herod Antipas’ court). Desperate, he comes to Jesus and begs, “Sir, come down [to Capernaum] before my child dies” (v. 49). Note Jesus’ reply in the first part of v. 50a, “Go; your son will live.” These words contain a partial granting and a partial denial. Jesus granted the healing, but He refused to go do to Capernaum. He gave the man no sign, He simply gave him His word. “The man believed the word that Jesus spoke to him and went on his way” (v. 50b). Believing is seeing!

Many were believing in Jesus because they saw His “signs and wonders” (v. 48). How did Jesus require a deeper faith from the official? In what way(s), is Jesus requiring a deeper faith from you?

Wednesday – Luke 5:1-11 (Matt. 4:18-22; Mark 1:16-20): Jesus already knew these men. He met them some time ago (cf. John 1:35-42).  Jesus had performed a miraculous sign in their presence (cf. John 2:1-11), and He even had them baptize believers for Him (cf. John 3:22; 4:12), but now He’s going to call them to a greater work. Luke’s account makes Simon (“who is called Peter” Matthew 4:18) central to the call of discipleship as he alone records the miraculous catch of fish and Peter’s reaction. Jesus begins Peter’s journey of discipleship not by calling him away from his profession but by challenging him to a bolder practice of it, “From now on you will be catching men” (v. 10). When the boats reached land, Peter and his partners left “everything and followed Him” (v. 11).

Jesus seized Simon Peter’s attention when He demonstrated His authority not just in religious teaching, but over fish. Why do you think authority over fish affected Simon so much more profoundly that what he had already witnessed? What kind of authority would get your attention that strongly?

Thursday – Mark 1:21-34 (Matt. 8:14-17; Luke 4:31-41): With the four disciples in tow, Jesus “went into Capernaum and immediately on the Sabbath He entered the synagogue and was teaching” (v. 21). As the people sat thunderstruck by His teaching, “immediately there was in their synagogue a man with an unclean spirit. And he cried out, ‘What have you to do with us, Jesus of Nazareth?’” (v. 23). The Christ has been challenged. Very likely there was stone-silence for a moment in the synagogue by the sea. Then Jesus responds, “Be silent and come out of him!” (v. 25). With wild convulsions the man was loosed from his demonic tormentor. Dumbfounded, the crowd questions, “What is this? A new teaching with authority!” (v. 27a). The same measure of authority with which they had been confronted by His teaching was the same word of command to the demon, “He commands even the unclean spirits, and they obey Him” (v. 27b). 

Imagine yourself there at the synagogue that Sabbath day and in Peter’s home afterwards, describe what you see, hear and witness, along with how you and others respond.

Friday – Mark 1:35-39 (Matt. 4:23-25; Luke 4:42-44): The early days of Jesus’ ministry were spent going from town-to-town “throughout all Galilee, preaching in their synagogues and casting out demons” (v. 39). Matthew’s parallel account gives us a glimpse at our Lord’s exhausting travels, healing work, and the swelling crowds that followed Him. Yet, Mark shows us what sustained Jesus during this time, “And rising very early in the morning, while it was still dark, He departed and went out to a desolate place, and there He prayed” (v. 35).

From both a practical and spiritual point-of-view, why do you think Jesus needed to do this? How do His actions speak to you?

The Flood: Judgment and Salvation


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The account of the flood is one of those biblical stories that changes as we grow older. As children we saw the flood story through the lens of pastel colors and soft edges. A big wooden boat, happy smiling animals, and a color rainbow completed the scene. But as we’ve grown up the story has come into sharper focus. Darker hues of sin, and the hard edges of death and destruction form the picture we see. For our lesson let’s blend the two images together. Let’s see the dark hues of judgment against a sinful world, but let’s retain the rosy picture of salvation. Because one without the other is an incomplete picture of God’s glorious work of judgment and salvation. Let’s begin with an overview of the text.

The Flood Story From Genesis:

  • 6:1-8 | A Wicked World Is Judged
  • 6:9-22 | God Gives Noah Instructions for His Salvation
  • 7:1-24 | The Earth Is Destroyed by Water
  • 8:1-19 | The Flood Subsides
  • 8:209:17 | God’s Covenant Rainbow

In the New Testament, the story of the flood is mentioned once by both Jesus and the Hebrew writer, but three times by Peter.

1. Water Is a Part of Salvation (1 Pet 3:21 | Gen 7:17 | Heb 11:7)

2. God Won’t Spare the Ungodly But Will Preserve the Godly (2 Pet 2:5, 9-10 | Gen 6:5-8)

3. Jesus Will Return a Second Time (2 Pet 3:4-7 | Gen 7:1-10 | Mat 24:37-39)

In the flood story God judged the sinful world but graciously saved Noah and his family. On one level the flood account is a re-creation story; through the waters of the flood God swept away sin to usher in a new beginning. As Peter states in 2 Peter 3:11-13, once again God will re-create, not with water, but with fire. If we want to rise above the judgment to come, if we want to live in God’s new creation, then we must live lives of holiness and godliness and trust in our gracious God to preserve us. That’s what saved Noah, it’s what will save you and me. 

Week 6 Summaries and Questions for The Life of Jesus Reading Plan


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So if you’re one of those people who thought reading the Bible cover-to-cover was a great idea you’ve probably hit a brick wall in Leviticus. Let’s face it, Leviticus is some hard reading. May I make a suggestion? Don’t give up on reading, shelve the cover-to-cover plan and start reading some more familiar material (and might I add more life changing). It’s not too late to pick up The Life and Teachings of Jesus reading plan. Download your copy today, I promise it’s a whole lot better than reading about how to spot leprosy.

Week 6 – February 10-14:

Monday – John 3:1-21: He was an earnest “Pharisee,” an aristocratic “ruler of the Jews” (v. 1) and “the teacher of Israel” (v. 10) and yet he had questions. Nicodemus couldn’t overlook the weight of the evidence, “we know that you are a teacher come from God, for no one can do these signs that you do unless God is with Him” (v. 2). Today’s text is rich in truth.  Two popular verses are a part of this exchange, “You must be born again…” (v. 3) and “For God so loved the world…” (v. 16). Throughout their discussion (one-sided as John records it), our Lord brings Nicodemus face-to-face with the necessity of breaking from religious norms and giving one’s self wholly to God’s transforming love.

Meditate on the truths that Jesus reveals to Nicodemus. What difference does (or should) it make to your attitudes and priorities that God calls for us to live renewed lives because of His great love for you?

Tuesday – John 3:22-36: As the popularity of Jesus grows, the many crowds that flock to Him to be baptized cause some to be jealous. A few of John’s disciples go to him complaining, “Rabbi, He who was with you across the Jordan, to whom you bore witness – look, He is baptizing, and all are going to Him” (v. 26). Rather than responding with jealous fear or anger, John displays the proper philosophy (vv. 27-28), proper attitude (v. 29), and the proper conduct (v. 30). Then, in vv. 31-36, he continues his ministry of bearing witness of Jesus the Christ, the Son of God.

Does John’s attitude toward himself and his own ministry, and toward Jesus and His ministry, suggest any example for you to follow? How do your actions reflect v. 30? Pray about how you can further grow in this area.

Wednesday – John 4:1-30: Samaria… any good Jew would spit as that word slid through their lips. The hatred between Samaritans and Jews was legendary (cf. Luke 9:53-54; John 8:48). Nevertheless, at times Samaritans featured prominently in Jesus’ ministry (cf. Luke 10:33-36; 17:16-18) and in the early church (cf. Acts 8:1, 4-8; 9:31). Looking past any animosity held between their peoples, the Lord Jesus reached out to this nameless woman sharing with her the satisfying “living waters” (v. 10) of the gospel.

Who are the “Samaritans” in your world – the people with whom decent or orthodox people have nothing to do with? How can you treat one of them as Jesus treated the woman of Sychar? What can you do to help such a person to recognize and believe in Jesus?

Thursday – John 4:31-45: When the Samaritan woman left Jesus she was happy. Her interaction with Christ stirred her very soul. Regrettably, the disciples evidently had not moved beyond the social and cultural conventions about the woman, as we see in v. 27, “Just then His disciples came back. They marveled that He was talking with a woman.” So we have a vivid contrast between the disciples’ narrow incredulity and the woman’s happy enthusiasm: they brought no one to see the Christ, but she brought the entire village (vv. 39-42).

After His encounter with the Samaritan woman, what specific lessons does Jesus teach to His disciples and to us?

Friday – Luke 4:14-30: Following Jesus’ fairly extensive ministry in Jerusalem and Judea (cf. John 2:1-4:1), He returns to his home region of Galilee where news of His teaching and healing exploit quickly spread throughout the countryside (v. 14b, 23). Then one Sabbath, at his hometown synagogue in Nazareth, Jesus read a Messianic passage from Isaiah and made an unambiguous claim that He was the Messiah who fulfilled the prophecy. Then He highlighted that He will be rejected by the Jews (vv. 23-24) and accepted by faithful Gentiles (vv. 25-27). These two themes run throughout the book of Acts and part of the Epistles. At this word the crowd wants to kill Him, but Jesus will have none of this ethno-nonsense, so miraculously He passed through the raging mob and went his way.

Observe the Nazarenes’ swiftly-changing attitudes toward Jesus – from praise in v. 22 to fury in v. 28. How do you account for the change? If you could address a person who made such a radical shift of faith, what would you say to them?