Week 14 Questions for 2019 Bible Reading Plan


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This week, we’re at a unique place in  New Testament, Psalms, and Proverbs Reading Plan. We’ll be ending the letter to the Romans, transitioning to a new and challenging part of Proverbs, beginning the epistle to the Galatians, and last but not least we’ll keep plugging away through Psalms.

On Tuesday, we’ll begin the middle section of Proverbs, sometimes called proverbs proper. The first section of Proverbs 1:8-9:18 prominently featured parental praise of wisdom in the form of poetic verse. Those chapters prepare the reader for the actual proverbs for which this book is known. The second section of Proverbs, 10:1-22:16, contains 375 of Solomon’s individual proverbs, or maxims. They are based on Solomon’s inspired knowledge given to him by God (1 Kings 3; 10:1-13). There’s going to be a lot to learn.

On Thursday, we’ll complete our reading of Paul’s powerful epistle to the Romans. For me, it has been a real challenge each day to formulate introductions and three questions that captured the essence of each chapter. I hope it was profitable.

On Friday, we’ll begin our reading of Galatians. The churches in the region of Galatia had come to Christ by faith – powerless to win God’s favor apart from His mercy. Nevertheless, certain people (often called Judaizers) were saying, that in order to be saved Gentile Christians had to be circumcised and keep the Law of Moses. In other words, salvation comes through keeping the Law, not by faith through grace. To safeguard the essence of the gospel, the apostle Paul reaffirms that we can only live right with God by faith in His Son, and His empowering presence in us.

Last, but not least, on Monday, Wednesday and Friday we’ll be challenged once again by David to take all of life’s pain and suffering (mostly due to our own sins) to the God who heals the broken.

May the God of all wisdom bless you this week as you continue to read His Word.

Monday, Apr. 1 – Romans 13; Psalm 38

Chapter 13 continues the theme of the transformed life Paul began in the previous chapter. Here Paul broadens the Christian’s sphere of responsibility by extending it to include the civil government under which he or she lives (vv. 1-7) and his or her fellow citizens (v. 8-14). In your own words, describe how Christians should be subject to governing authorities. Explain what it means for “love [to be] the fulfillment of the law” (v. 10)? Think back over this chapter. In what ways do you need to “put on the Lord Jesus Christ” in your relationship to the government and your fellow citizens?

Psalm 38 is another of David’s penitential psalms (also: Psalms 6; 32; 51; 102; 130; 143). This is a lament that lays a person’s troubles before God, when that person realized that his troubles result from his own sin. The psalm describes anguish of body and mind, desertion of friends, and how the singer’s folly has made him vulnerable to his enemies. Not all the troubles of life are the result from one’s sins, nevertheless this psalm is geared to those that do. Why is it not possible to have a sense of mental, physical, relational, or spiritual well-being when you’re aware of unconfessed sin? How does God use mental, physical, relational, or spiritual ailments to bring us to confession and repentance? How long are you usually willing to tolerate these ailments before you just own up to what you did? What’s causing you pain now? How can you decisively deal with the sin God is wants you to address?

Tuesday, Apr. 2 – Romans 14; Proverbs 10:1-7

The debt of love applied directly to a situation within the Roman church, knowing how to live with Christian freedoms. This section of Romans deals with Christian conduct when God does not specify exactly what we should do in every situation. In such cases some Christians will do one thing and others another, but both within God’s will. How to handle these situations is the focus of this passage. What is Paul’s overall message to “strong” Christians (those who don’t feel obliged to refrain from meat, wine, or keep holy days)? To “weak” Christians (those who feel obliged)? Someone somewhere is bound to be offended by almost anything we do! How can you practically apply the principles of this chapter?

The first section of Proverbs 1:8-9:18 prominently featured parental praise of wisdom in the form of poetic verse. Those chapters prepare the reader for the actual proverbs for which this book is known. The second section of Proverbs, 10:1-22:16, contains 375 of Solomon’s individual proverbs, or maxims. They are based on Solomon’s inspired knowledge given to him by God (1 Kings 3; 10:1-13). Generally there appears to be no apparent order. However, at closer examination it’s often the case that individual proverbs are grouped together into small collections which, taken together, give the reader a more complete understanding of a given topic. Finally, one last note about the types of proverbs we will encounter in our readings. The parallel, two line proverbs of chapters 10-15 are mostly contrast or opposites (antithetical), while those of chapters 16-22 are mostly similarities or comparisons (synthetical). In what ways have you seen a wise child, make his or her parents proud (v. 1)? Gain life through righteousness (v. 2)? Protection from God (v. 3)? Become a diligent worker (vv. 4-5)? And receive blessings from others (vv. 6-7)? Of these proverbs, select the one that spoke to you the most and post it on social media or share with a friend. For extra credit explain why you needed this word of wisdom.

Wednesday, Apr. 3 – Romans 15; Psalm 39

Paul now develops the key concept to which he referred to in chapter 14, namely putting the welfare of others before that of self. This is love. To solidify his argument he cites the example of Christ who lived free of taboos and unnecessary inhibitions but was always careful to bear with the weaknesses of others. Focusing on vv. 1-13, how is Christ the supreme example of what Paul commands? If you follow Christ’s example in this and other areas of your life why will you need “endurance… encouragement… and hope” (vv. 4-5)? Why are Bible study and prayer essential if you are to maintain these attitudes as you serve/yield to others?

Psalm 39 is an exceptionally heavy lament, which compares with Job 7 and much of Ecclesiastes. With these words, David allows those who are suffering (especially at the hand of God see vv. 10, 13) to express the pain of their anguish. The circumstances of the suffering are left vague, although there is acknowledgment of sin (vv. 8, 11); the focus is on how suffering is a reminder of the fleeting nature of human life. What images does David use to describe the brevity of life? From your perspective, why is brevity of life both a bitter curse and a blessing? How do these twin perspectives, bitter curse and blessing, affect the way you live your short life here on Earth?

Thursday, Apr. 4 – Romans 16; Proverbs 10:8-14

In Jesus, believers have a bond that is stronger than flesh and blood. We are now and will always be brothers and sisters in Christ, members of God’s family. In this, the last chapter of Romans, Paul introduces us to some of his spiritual family. Men and women of faith who have aided and helped him along his ministry journey. Paul praises several people in vv. 1-15 for things they have done. What deeds and qualities does he commend? Think about how these Christians are models for you to follow. Write down several ideas on how you can help a minister, your pastors, a missionary, etc. in their work and service to God’s people. Lastly, how has Romans helped you to understand your salvation more completely?

Here Solomon contrast the actions of the “righteous” and the “wicked.” These contrast began in v. 6 and will go throughout the rest of chapter 10. How does Solomon describe the actions and blessings of a “righteous” person? In contrast, how does he describe the actions and curses of a “wicked” person? Applying these wise words to yourself, in what ways can you strengthen your “righteous” behaviors and correct your “wicked” deeds?

Friday, Apr. 5 – Galatians 1; Psalm 40

The churches in the region of Galatia had come to Christ by faith – powerless to win God’s favor apart from His mercy. Nevertheless, certain people (often called Judaizers) were saying, that in order to be saved Gentile Christians had to be circumcised and keep the Law of Moses. In other words, salvation comes through keeping the Law, not by faith through grace. To safeguard the essence of the gospel, the apostle Paul reaffirms that we can only live right with God by faith in His Son Jesus, and His empowering presence in us. Paul abruptly begins his letter to the Galatians. Omitting his customary expression of thanksgiving, he plunges immediately into an impassioned discussion of their accepting a new, so-called gospel and his call by God to preach the true gospel of Christ. As you read this opening chapter how would you describe the mood of this passage? How do you think Paul would respond to the claim there are many roads that lead to heaven? Why? What aspect(s) of the gospel do you need more grace and faith right now to believe and practice? Pray to God about this and seek the help of a trusted believer.

Psalm 40 is a combination of both thanksgiving for God’s past aid (vv. 1-11) and a lament/prayer for continued deliverance (vv. 12-17). Unlike investment institutions, perhaps David would say that with God, past performance is indicative of future results. Why does the power of God seem more obvious after a relatively long period of waiting for Him to act? Why should this encourage us all the more to hang in there while we’re waiting on God’s timing? Make a list of the prayers you’re waiting for God to answer. Go through your list and ask God to remember your plea and for patience to wait on Him.

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