When Honey Words Kill


honey lips kill proverbs 5.3-4

A wise-warning for men:

“For the lips of a forbidden woman drip honey, and her speech is smoother than oil, but in the end she is bitter as poison, and as sharp as a two-edged sword.” (Proverbs 5:3-4)

The Bible does not hide from or obscure the power of the temptation of illicit sex. In clear and direct language the Holy text warns its reader of the disaster that awaits the man who would succumb in this area of life. So it warns that the “forbidden woman” tempts her prey, not only with sex, but with words. This man is drawn to her because she strokes his ego with the sweetness of praise; saying all the things he has longed to hear. However, in the end, her lips are full of deadly poison and her words a dagger that brings death. So today men, “Tune your ears to wisdom” because it will “save you from the forbidden woman, from the seductive words of the adulterous woman” (Proverbs 2:2, 16).

For the whole passage read Proverbs 5:1-23

Other post in Honey Wisdom:

When Honey Words Heal

The Sweetness of Wisdom

Too Much of A Good Thing Will Make You Vomit

There’s Nothing Sweet About Seek One’s Own Glory

The Sweet Satisfaction of Contentment

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2 thoughts on “When Honey Words Kill

  1. Hi there. I like this picture. I believe the Proverbs ‘strange’ or ‘estranged’ or ‘foreign’ woman is likely a married prostitute, in simple terms. If not, she is likely a serial adulteress. I believe Hebrew likely didn’t have a word for ‘serial’, and the English word serial apparently didn’t come into existence until around the mid 19th century. http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=serial

    She is apparently seductive/flattering. Honey dropping from her lips is a legitimate way of reading Proverbs 5:3. ‘As’ is italicized in the KJV and isn’t in the Vulgate, Septuagint, nor Masoretic Text there. The latter two versions have a word which can mean ‘honey’, particularly the Septuagint.

    I’ll send you some of my research, condensced.

    Proverbs’ Strange/Estranged woman/wife (to/from her husband/house perhaps) or Foreign woman/wife and ‘Foreign woman’ was likely, in relatively simple terms:

    1) a married prostitute or
    2) a serial adulteress

    Terms for her in Proverbs:

    Proverbs ‘Strange woman/wife’ (Heb: אִשָּׁ֣ה זָרָה ‘ishah zar-ay’/Heb: זָרָה ‘zar-ay’), (possibly to her husband/house) or ‘Estranged woman/wife’ (possibly from her
    husband/house) or ‘Foreign woman/wife’ and ‘Foreign woman’ (Heb: נָכְרִיָּֽה ‘nak-ree-ay’), (foreign women were likely prostitutes in ancient Israel at least
    partially due to Lev 19:29 and/or Deut 23:17-18 ‘frowning’ on Israelite prostitutes/temple prostitutes)

    There are at least two different terms for her in Hebrew Proverbs. This fact, in my opinion, shows she is more complex than simply a ‘prostitute’ or ‘an
    adulteress’ or ‘an immoral woman’.

    Latin extraneus ‘foreign, external, from without’ ->
    Old French estrange, ‘foreign, alien, unusual, unfamiliar, curious, distant, inhospitable, estranged, separated’ ->
    English strange (adj) late 13c, ‘foreign,of external origin or kind or character,exciting wonder,discouraging familiarities or reserved or distant,estranged’

    Vulgar Latin *extraneare, ‘to treat as a stranger’ ->
    Middle French ‘estrangier’, to alienate ->
    English estranged (adj) late 15c, to remove from customary environment or associations, to arouse mutual enmity or indifference in where there had formerly
    been love, affection, or friendliness, alienate

    (Heb: אִשָּׁ֣ה זָרָה , ‘ishah zar-ay’/Heb: זָרָה ‘zar-ay’, ‘strange/estranged woman/wife’) is used in Prov 2:16, 5:3, 5:20, 7:5; plural for ‘zar-ay’, זָר֑וֹת , ‘zarvot’ in
    22:14, 23:33

    (Heb: נָכְרִיָּֽה , ‘nakariyah’, ‘foreign woman’ is used in Prov 2:16, 5:20, 6:24, 7:5, 20:16, 23:27, 27:13

    My opinion: At least one of the primary terms for her in the Book of Proverbs, ‘foreign woman/wife’ or ‘strange woman/wife’ or ‘estranged woman/wife’ (זָרָה ,
    ‘zarah’ and אִשָּׁה זָרָה , ‘ishah zarah’) can also mean an estranged woman/wife, and thus from her husband, or a strange woman/wife to her husband, and thus a
    serial adulteress.

    One can make one’s own opinion on what the aforementioned terms or words mean in the Book of Proverbs, but my opinion is that Proverbs’ ‘strange women’ are
    not the same type of ‘strange women’

    1) mentioned in the 1st Book of Kings 11:1-8; Ezra 10:2,6,8,10-14,17-18,44; Nehemiah 13:23-27; Tobit 4:12-13 (foreign women with foreign religion, lifestyle,
    god[s] from nations adjacent to ancient Israel or ancient Judah)

    2) and Ruth (Ruth 1:4,15;2:10-11; a foreign woman from Moab friendly to the worship of the Jewish deity).

    Proverbs’ ‘strange woman’ is called so because of her sexual habits.

    The terms used could be further defined as in

    1) a married, seductive, serial adulteress, who lives with her husband in a house and is also a prostitute or
    2) a married, seductive, serial adulteress, who lives with her husband in a house

    but I’m trying to simplify the meaning of the terms in Proverbs.

    Reasons I believe Proverbs ‘foreign woman’ is either a married prostitute or a serial adulteress:

    Prov 2:17 mentions her forsaking (participle, so appears to be ongoing) the guide (possibly husband) of her youth; coupled in particular with Prov 5:18
    which mentions ‘wife of thy youth’ and Micah 7:5 which uses the same word as ‘guide’ in Prov 2:17, ‘Trust ye not in a friend [possibly husband], put ye not
    confidence in a guide [likely at least partially in reference to a husband]: keep the doors of thy mouth from her [likely wife] that lieth in thy bosom’
    Prov 2:18 mentions she has sunk her house unto death and her paths unto the dead, and
    Prov 2:19 mentions in Hebrew, Greek, Latin, ‘all’ who go into/unto her. So apparently she’s serial, repetitive about her behavior, and has many ‘victims’

    Prov 5:3 in the ‘Septuagint’ and ‘Vulgate’ has the Greek (πόρνης) and Latin (meretricis) genitive noun for prostitute
    Prov 5:5 mentions ‘her feet’ going down to death and ‘her steps’ taking hold of Sheol. ‘Feet’ and ‘steps’ reminds one of a streetwalker/prostitute, and the
    verse seems to imply continuous action.
    Prov 5:6 mentions that her ways/paths/tracks quiver/stagger/wander/are moveable, which is consistent with a streewalker/prostitute.

    Prov 5:9-10 advises to avoid a ‘foreign’ or ‘estranged’ woman, and her house, lest you give (same Hebrew word, used for a ‘gift’ to a prostitute, נתן
    ‘nâthan’ , in Gen 38:16-18, Ezek 16:33-34) four things, your honor, your years, your strength and your labors.
    Prov 5:9-10 mentions ‘cruel’ and ‘house of a stranger’, both masculine singular, perhaps hinting she is married.

    Prov 6:24 mentions avoiding flattery of a ‘foreign’ or ‘strange’ tongue, or flattery of tongue of a ‘strange’ or ‘foreign’ woman
    Prov 6:25 mentions not to lust after her beauty in your heart, nor let her take you with her eyelids (prostitutes tend to paint their eyelids)
    Prov 6:26 mentions the Hebrew word for prostitute, and also mentions ‘hunts’
    Prov 6:26,29,32,34 mentions adulteress, adultery, and jealousy/rage of a man/husband, so she is likely married.

    Prov 7:8 mentions ‘street’ and ‘her corner’
    Prov 7:10 mentions a ‘strange’ or ‘foreign’ woman with an attire of a harlot
    Prov 7:11 mentions that her feet abide not in her house, which is consistent with a streetwalker/prostitute.
    Prov 7:12 mentions her in the streets or squares or plazas and lying in wait at (or near) every corner (prostitutes tend to be found at or near corners
    of streets)
    Prov 7:16 mentions her bed having something from Egypt, so a ‘foreign’ aspect is mentioned.
    Prov 7:19 mentions ‘the man’ of the house, so apparently she is married and lives with her husband.
    Prov 7:26 mentions her casting down many wounded/slain, so again, she is serial, continuous in her harlotry, and has many victims

    Prov 9:13-18 mentions a similar or the same type of woman (‘lacking a morsel’ in the ‘Septuagint’, perhaps a prostitute soliciting) calling out in
    invitation to many at a high place in a city, who says ‘stolen water is sweet, hidden bread is pleasant’ (stolen water probably refers to adultery)

    Prov 20:16 possibly has a reference to a pledge (perhaps of a cloak) or payment for sex with a ‘foreign’ woman.
    Prov 20:17 mentions ‘bread of deceit’ being sweet, again, possibly a reference to adultery (Gen 39:6 mentions ‘the bread’ of Potiphar, perhaps at least
    partially referring to his wife; Also, Prov 6:26 mentions ‘bread’ in conjunction with a prostitute)

    Prov 23:27 mentions a ‘foreign woman’ in conjunction with the Hebrew word for prostitute, and calls her a ‘narrow pit’ or ‘narrow well’ (deep, perhaps
    unclean, and hard to escape from)
    Prov 23:28 mentions ‘also she’ (so she could be like a prostitute in lying in wait) lies in wait as for a prey (or as a bandit or robber, maybe hunter or
    something similar; Targum has ‘beast of prey’) and increases the transgressors among men. (Sounds like a sexual stalker, so could be some kind of prostitute)

    Prov 27:13 again has a possible reference to a pledge (perhaps of a cloak) or payment for sex with a ‘foreign woman’

    (Sirach 9:3) Sept, μὴ ὑπάντα γυναικὶ ἑταιριζομένῃ, μήποτε ἐμπέσῃς εἰς τὰς παγίδας αὐτῆς (Not meet [with? a] woman courtesan or woman courtesaning, lest
    thou fall into her snares). Heb: אִשָּׁה זָרָה woman strange or foreign or estranged (woman, [Heb: אִשָּׁה ish-shaw’], strange/foreign/estranged [Heb: זָרָה ‘zoor-ay’]),
    entire verse: (Heb: ג) אַל תִּקְרַב אֶל אִשָּׁה זָרָה, פֶּן תִּפּוֹל בִּמְצוּדֹתֶיהָ )

    http://www.ellopos.net/elpenor/greek-texts/septuagint/chapter.asp?book=30&page=9

    Greek verbal participle ἑταιριζομένῃ (‘courtesaning’) can be taken as a noun (courtesan), many participles are like this.

    (Sirach 9:3) Heb: Not approach (Heb: קְרַב ‘qârab’, approach, come, go, offer) unto (Heb: אֶל ‘unto’, ‘toward’, ‘near’, ‘among’, ‘into’) a strange woman, (Heb:
    אִשָּׁה זָרָה ‘woman strange/foreign/estranged’), lest you fall into her snares (Heb: בִּמְצוּדֹ , into ‘snares’, ‘nets’, bulwarks’, ‘munitions’)

    http://he.wikisource.org/wiki/%D7%91%D7%9F_%D7%A1%D7%99%D7%A8%D7%90_%D7%98

    Thus, I think in simple terms, Proverbs ‘foreign’ or ‘estranged’ or ‘strange’ woman is a married prostitute. She apparently isn’t directly called a
    prostitute in Hebrew Proverbs, perhaps at least because of these reasons:

    1) Hebrew noun Zonah in the Hebrew Bible always or almost always referred to a ‘professional’ or ‘unmarried’ prostitute, when referring to a living person.
    2) This Hebrew noun is used elsewhere in Proverbs (6:26;7:10;23:27;29:3) so directly calling this ‘foreign woman’ a Zonah could be confusing
    3) She fulfills a much larger role than simply a ‘prostitute’, such as her married serial adultery (Prov 2:16-19; 5:3-6,8-11,14,22-23; 6:24-26,29,32,34;
    7:5,10-12,19,26-27; possibly 9:13-18; 20:16-17) and her seduction, her flattering/’smooth’ tongue/mouth/lips (Prov 2:16; 5:3; 6:24-25; 7:5,21; possibly 9:17),
    and her ‘foreign’ connection (Prov 7:16)
    4) Directly calling this foreign woman a prostitute could imply all foreign women are prostitutes, which common sense says is wrong.

    Addendum:

    The ‘strange’ or ‘foreign’ or ‘estranged’ (possibly from her husband/house) woman of Proverbs is not necessarily the same type of ‘strange woman’ found
    elsewhere in the Bible, such as 1 Kings 11, Ezra, Nehemiah, which has the usual term for ‘foreign woman’ (nokeriyah); a foreign women with foreign religion,
    lifestyle, god[s] from nations adjacent to ancient Israel or ancient Judah. Ruth 1:15 in particular mentions the foreign god/gods.

    The Hebrew noun for prostitute in the Bible always or almost always, when in reference to an actual living human, referred to a ‘professional’ or
    ‘unmarried’ prostitute. In Hebrew of Proverbs, Proverbs’ ‘strange’ or ‘foreign’ or ‘estranged’ woman apparently isn’t directly called a prostitute.
    Septuagint and Vulgate in Prov 5:3 has the Greek and Latin genitive noun for prostitute. She apparently is a serial adulteress or a prostitute who is a
    serial adulteress (married prostitute; serial adulterous prostitute).

    I believe all of the ‘strange women’ in Proverbs fits the description of Proverbs 7 ‘strange woman’. She apparently is married since Prov 7:19 mentions ‘the
    man’ of the house. Since Prov 23:27-28 mentions ‘a whore [prostitute] is a deep ditch, and a strange woman is a narrow pit. She also lieth in wait as for a
    prey [or as a bandit or robber, maybe hunter or something similar; Targum has ‘beast of prey’] and increaseth the transgressors among men’, it is
    reasonable to assume that Proverbs ‘strange’ or ‘foreign’ or ‘estranged woman’ is something extremely like or identical with a prostitute. References or
    possible references to adultery are peppered throughout Proverbs, such as Prov 2:17 ‘guide of her youth’ (coupled in particular with Prov 5:18 which
    mentions ‘wife of thy youth’ and Micah 7:5 which uses the same word as ‘guide’ in Prov 2:17, ‘Trust ye not in a friend [possibly husband], put ye not
    confidence in a guide [likely at least partially in reference to a husband]: keep the doors of thy mouth from her [likely wife] that lieth in thy
    bosom’); 5:9,10 (house of a stranger/a cruel [one]); Prov 6:26,29,32,34 mentions adulteress, adultery, rage of a man/husband; Prov 7:19 ‘the man’ of the
    house. Prov 9:17 ‘stolen water is sweet, hidden bread is pleasant’ (Stolen water is likely a reference to adultery, since Prov 5:15 likens the wife to
    ‘water’, referring to her as a cistern and a well and running/flowing waters).

    I believe all of the verses until 5:19 at least has partial reference to a wife, likening her to water in some way or another. “Hidden bread’ could also be
    a reference to a wife, (Gen 39:6 mentions ‘the bread’ of Potiphar as possibly obliquely referring to his wife), and ‘hidden bread’ could possibly obliquely
    reference a prostitute since Prov 6:26 mentions ‘bread’ in conjuction with prostitute. Prov 30:20 also mentions a ‘woman/wife of adultery’ or ‘adulterous
    woman/wife’, who seems to lack a conscience about it and appears to be serial in her adultery. Prov 20:16-17 (Prov 27:13 is basically a repetition of Prov
    20:16) is another possible reference to prostitution and/or adultery.

    Prov 2:16-17;5:9-10;6:26,29,32;7:19;9:17;20:16-17;30:20 are possible references to her adultery and her being married. ‘guide of her youth and covenant of
    her God/god(s)’ likely has at least partial reference to her husband and adultery as Prov 5:18 mentions ‘wife of thy youth’ and Micah 7:5 mentions trusting
    not in a ‘guide’ (likely at least partial reference to one’s husband) nor the woman in your bosom (likely one’s wife). Stolen water and hidden bread/bread
    of deceit are likely references to adultery (Potiphar’s wife is possibly obliquely referred to as ‘the bread’ of Potiphar in Gen 39:6). A thief when he is
    hungry is compared to an adulterer in Prov 6:30. Bread is mentioned in connection with a prostitute or harlot in Prov 6:26, either that she can reduce you
    to a loaf/cake of bread or that she can be had for a loaf/cake of bread, or both. Prov 20:16-17 and 27:13 are possible references to a pledge or payment for
    sex with this ‘strange woman’.

    Claiming she is simply a prostitute in Proverbs is wrong in my opinion, but so is claiming she merely an ‘adulteress’. An adulteress isn’t necessarily a
    narrow pit/well and doesn’t necessarily lieth in wait as for a prey/as a robber/as a bandit and increaseth the transgressors among men (Prov 23:27-28), nor ]
    is an adulteress necessarily flattering/seducing (Prov 2:16; 5:3; 6:24-25; 7:5,21; possibly 9:14-17), nor does an adulteress necessarily have ways/paths/
    tracks that quiver/stagger/wander/are moveable (Prov 5:6), nor does she have necessarily have beauty worth mentioning (Prov 6:25), nor does she necessarily
    take/capture/captivate one with her eyelids (Prov 6:25), nor does she necessarily have ‘a corner’ (Prov 7:8), be in ‘an attire of a harlot’ (Prov 7:10), nor
    does ‘her feet rest not in her house’ necessarily (Prov 7:11), nor is she necessarily ‘in the streets/markets/plazas, lieth in wait at every corner’ (Prov
    7:12), nor does an adulteress necessarily call out to many in invitation at a high place in a city (possibly Prov 9:14-15), have numerous adulterous
    partners (possibly Prov 9:14-18), ‘all who go into/unto her’ (Prov 2:19 in Hebrew/Sept/Vulgate), nor does she necessarily ‘cast down many wounded/
    slain’ (Prov 7:26), imply having adultery with her is sweet (possibly Prov 9:17) or have many victims (possibly Prov 9:18), for instance.
    ‘Adulteress’ isn’t the actual term in any of the ancient texts in Proverbs where ‘strange’ or ‘foreign’ or ‘estranged’ woman is at, not just the KJV.
    Divorce wasn’t an option for ancient Israelite women, so it is unlikely she is a divorcee, at least per se. A husband could divorce a wife for virtually any
    reason, but not the other way around. Prov 2:17 has a participle, ‘forsaking’, in the Hebrew and ‘Septuagint’, which might refer to an ongoing action. (2:17)
    refers to her ‘forsaking the guide of her youth’ הַ֭עֹזֶבֶת אַלּ֣וּף נְעוּרֶ֑יהָ (Heb: עֹזֶבֶת ‘ozebet’, ‘forsaking’, qal participle; Sept: ἀπολείπουσα, present participle;
    Vulgate: relinquit, present indicative active. She also is said to have ‘forgotten’/’left’/’ignored’/’ceased to care about’ the covenant of her God/god(s),
    sunk her house unto death, her paths unto the dead, and mention is made of ‘all’ (Hebrew/’LXX’/Vulgate), plural, who go into her (2:19). Prov 2:16 also
    mentions her smooth words. Those facts sound more than just merely any ‘adulteress’ to me.

    Even Luther’s Bible which has ‘adulteress’ in Prov 23:27 instead of ‘strange’ or ‘foreign’ or ‘estranged’ woman implies she is more than just an
    ‘adulteress’ with his plural words: Luther’s Bible: Prov 23:28 Auch lauert sie wie ein Räuber (she lieth in wait as a robber), und die Frechen, (‘the
    insolent’, plural) unter den Menschen (‘the men’, plural) sammelt sie zu sich, ‘and the insolent among the men gathers she to herself’ (serial adulteress,
    possibly prostitute also). Luther’s Bible in Prov 2:19 also uses the German word ‘alle’, which is a nominative plural meaning ‘all’.

    The English word ‘serial’ apparently didn’t come into being until around the mid 19th century – http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=serial

    Even when some old commentaries referred to her as possibly being an
    ‘adulteress’ (a prostitute is also an often suspected identity for her), the implication was often that she was serial in her adultery. In Ezekiel 16
    Jerusalem is portrayed as a spiritual serial adulteress (16:8,24-26,28-29,31-39), ‘taking strangers/foreigners (plural) instead of her husband’, mention is
    made of her ‘lovers’ (plural), her whoredoms (plural) with Egyptians, Assyrians, and from the land of Canaan to Chaldea, her ‘opening her feet to everyone
    that passes by’, her multiplying/increasing her whoredoms (plural), but a ‘spiritual serial adulteress’ is called a prostitute (Ezekiel 16:35). A physical
    serial adulteress isn’t necessarily a prostitute, however.

    The ‘strange’ woman in Proverbs 7 doesn’t apparently explicitly ask for money. This might be because she is like Jerusalem which is described as a wife
    taking strangers/foreigners (plural) over her husband in Ezekiel 16. The fact that Proverbs ‘strange woman’ is ‘an adulteress’ is worse than that she might
    be a ‘prostitute’, in my opinion (See Exo 20:14; Lev 20:10; Deut 5:18; 22:22). Jerusalem was a spiritual prostitute and explicitly named as one in Ezekiel
    16:35. Ezekiel 16:33 says they give a gift or gifts to all whores/prostitutes. Always or almost always, the Hebrew noun for prostitute in the Bible, when in
    reference to an actual living being meant a professional or unmarried prostitute.

    In my opinion, there isn’t really reason to think that other ‘strange women’ in Proverbs are substantially different than Proverbs 7 ‘strange woman’, which,
    if not a prostitute, is apparently as close as one can get to being one, since Prov 7:8-12 mentions ‘street’ and ‘her corner’, her being in a ‘harlot’s
    attire’, ‘her feet rest not in her house’, she is in the streets/markets/plazas (plural in virtually all versions, in particular ancient ones such as the
    Masoretic/’Septuagint’/Vulgate), and she ‘lieth in wait at every corner’. Prov 7:19 mentions ‘the man’ of the house and Prov 7:16 mentions her ‘foreign
    connection’, so either or both may be reason(s) why she isn’t apparently explicitly referred to as a prostitute in Hebrew.

    The Hebrew noun for professional or unmarried prostitute is mentioned in Prov 6:26;7:10;23:27;29:3. Always or almost always that noun, in the Bible, refers
    to a professional or unmarried prostitute when it refers to a living person, as opposed to a city (Jerusalem for instance in Ezekiel 16:35), possibly
    nation or possibly a group of people/people group.

    Some say the ‘strange woman’ is any woman you’re not married to, which implies every woman you’re not married to is a prostitute or basically is one or is
    an ‘immoral woman’ (Prov 7:5,10-12,19,26-27), and it also implies every woman you’re not married to is also a ‘narrow pit/well, and lieth in wait as for a
    prey (or as a robber or as a bandit) and increaseth the transgressors among men’ (Prov 23:27-28), and it also implies that every woman you’re not married to
    also is a serial adulteress (Prov 2:16-19; 5:3-6,8-11,14,22-23; 6:24-26,29,32,34; 7:5,10-12,19,26-27; possibly 9:13-18; 20:16-17), and seducing with
    flattering/’smooth’ tongue/mouth/lips (Prov 2:16; 5:3; 6:24-25; 7:5,21; possibly 9:17)

    The idea that she may be ‘the one not your own’ (wife) came from the mistranslation/different source text/multiple meaning of Septuagint Prov 5:20 which says
    ‘neither’ (Sept: μηδὲ) … ‘the one’ (της, genitive singular definite article, feminine) not [possibly of] your own (ἴδιας, genitive, ‘idias’) tribe/tongue/
    race/nation/wife. The Masoretic text/Hebrew and many other versions have ‘foreign’ or ‘strange’ or ‘estranged’ woman here.

    She is obviously much more than ‘an adulteress’, although I dislike the claim that she is merely a prostitute. I believe she is either a serial adulteress
    or a married prostitute/prostitute who is a serial adulteress/serial adulterous prostitute.

    She may be an ‘estranged’ wife/woman from her husband. One of the main terms for her in Hebrew Proverbs, zarah/ishah zarah can have an ‘estranged’
    meaning to it. http://biblehub.com/aramaic-plain-english/proverbs/7.htm

    The pastor I agree with probably the most is this one here, by the name of M. Sean Reynolds, where he says:

    Therefore, the “foreign woman” in Proverbs is a seductive adulteress, who is also sometimes a prostitute.

    http://www.thewholecounsel.com/proverbs-2214/

    Pastor/priest/Bible scholar George Leo Haydock’s Catholic commentary (mid 19th century) lists a married ‘abandoned woman’ (prostitute) as a preferred
    definition of who she is, citing Antoine Augustin Calmet (a French Benedictine monk of the 17th and 18th centuries who wrote commentaries on the Bible)

    http://haydock1859.tripod.com/id1096.html

    Here is pastor Bob Yandian who identifies her as a prostitute and claims a verse in Prov 9 shows what she’s really like, and implies her serial adulterous
    side with the words ‘He is stealing waters that rightfully belong to another man’, and with ‘This woman has a long list of successes and they are all lying
    flat on their backs in the coffin.’

    http://www.bobyandian.com/the-strange-woman/

    Here is pastor Larry Wood who thinks she is at least some type of prostitute.

    http://www.biblenews1.com/babylon/babylon3.html

    ‘For the prostitute is a deep pit,
    And the foreign prostitute is a narrow well. (Proverbs 23:27)’

    Here is pastor Darrell Mitchell

    http://www.netbiblestudy.com/00_cartimages/Proverbs.pdf

    Chapter 5 is an exhortation to get acquaintance with and submit to the laws of
    wisdom. Verses 3-4 give a particular caution against these heathen temple prostitutes
    and remedies are prescribed against that sin.

    the primary scope of this chapter is to relate the symbol of the
    adulterous woman of idolatry, that tend to degrade men’s minds and manners –- these
    temple harlots certainly apply!

    Here are some videos which I believe are along the lines of who I think she is:

    To me, it is obvious the Proverbs’ ‘strange woman’ is either a serial adulteress or a married prostitute (serial adulterous prostitute, prostitute who is a
    serial adulteress)

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